The first step to save and restore Graeser Park has already been taken.

Marcia Glick, City Manager of Robbinsdale, Minnesota, has confirmed that MnDOT has begun the title work. When completed, MnDOT can transfer ownership of Graeser Park to Robbinsdale.

This process could take until summer of 2019, possibly longer. Robbinsdale cannot begin park restoration until ownership is transferred.

This’ll be a marathon, not a sprint. Stay tuned.

What could be restored in Graeser Park?

Beehive fireplace
Picnic tables
Rock Garden fountain
Limestone benches

Graeser Park’s restoration can happen with

  • Local government involvement
  • Local and national fundraising efforts
  • Community support
  • Tie-ins with local Historical Societies
  • Crowdfunding
  • Corporate sponsorship (but not naming rights—since park is named for Carl Graeser, it’s important to keep name)
  • Strong social media campaigns
  • Matching gift drive
  • and more…

Funding Graeser Park’s restoration will require community support.

Let Lilac Park’s restoration be your inspiration. This 2009 project in St. Louis Park came with a $225,000+ price tag. And Graeser Park is much bigger—with more structures—than Lilac Park.

Picnic table tops, bases, and limestone saved from MnDOT’s ‘Beehive Graveyard’ can be used to restore Graeser Park.

When MnDOT dismantled three Lilac Way parks for road construction, they saved the fragments, table tops and bases in the Beehive Graveyard.

Now, Robbinsdale has those pieces in storage for safekeeping, so they can be used to restore Graeser Park.

Scroll to see what MnDOT saved in the ‘Beehive Graveyard’.

The 2018-2022 Robbinsdale Capital Improvement Plan shows $190,000 allocated for Graeser Park Improvements. View the report for more info.

Robbinsdale Capital Improvement Plan, 2018-22 (detail). Projects and funding sources for Park System.
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